Any other D17 owners still out there ?


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jimcallaghan
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:43 pm
Location: United Kingdom

Any other D17 owners still out there ?

Post by jimcallaghan »

If so it might be good to exchange a few notes on how to keep these old boats going.

Best regards to you all

Jim

Old Harry
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:34 pm
Location: Rushden Northants

Are there any owners out ther?

Post by Old Harry »

I have D17 number 30 - Now named 'Old Harry'.
He starred in a Time Team episode - 'Harrold's Field'
The boat is in good sailing order although I have a long list of improvements,
many simply cosmetic, to be made.
I'm concerned that the wooden underfloor dividers are a bit rotten - any body tackled the same problem?
I have many photos so will try to post some.
I can't think of another boat type that suits my requirements better- even at many times the price?
Old Harry rocks!

jimcallaghan
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:43 pm
Location: United Kingdom

Post by jimcallaghan »

Hi Harry,

I agree, they are great boats. Stable enough to take the family. lots of room, bunks to overnight under the sprayhood and with the tent, more space than a hard top boat of the same size. She is suprisingly quick and close winded given her shape.

My boat has a similar problem with the floor supports. It does not cause a big problem other than a bit of flex to the interior deck and leaking around the centreboard pivot bolt (the case is also wood) if it's not securely tightened.

The root cause of the rot seems to be rain water finding it's way under the deck. It seems to be impossible to stop. And the water itself is a bigger problem for me as my boat lives on a mooring in Chichester when in use. It's ok if I get round to pumping out regularly but if I missed a few weeks it a bit of rain water would be the least of my damp problems.

Rather than take an angle grinder to the deck and then try and re-fit it I wondered about filling the voids under the deck with closed cell expanding polyester foam. The two pack stuff that you can pour in. This would make the problem with the rot moot(the foam would support the floor) and stop the risk of sinking because their would be no where for the water to collect.

Of course, if you got it wrong and left voids that would be very bad because there would be no way to empty them when they did fill up. This has put me off so far but I can't really re-launch her without a solution so I may have to try this year.

Other than that there are not many few maintenance niggles. The main other issue I have is being able to antifoul the centre board without a boat lift. But thats a general issue with swing keel boats.

Let me know how you get on with your boat.

Old Harry
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2009 9:34 pm
Location: Rushden Northants

Bilges

Post by Old Harry »

Old Harry is dry sailed and kept under cover but still gets water in the bilges. I have come to the conclusion the centreboard case leaks - which is quite likely if it is made from plywood as you suggest.
I think to fill the floatation tanks with foam would only ensure that the boat could never sink. (I had thought about filling all the voids with empty (very clean) plastic milk cartons with the tops glued on, but for me it doesn't really seem necessary). Has anyone ever capsized a D17? I'm sure I read somwhere that they are self righting - but I'd be surprised.
Some pictures of Old Harry should appear in the gallery soon.
Old Harry rocks!

jimcallaghan
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 2:43 pm
Location: United Kingdom

Post by jimcallaghan »

Hi Richard

After being launched after being ashore under cover for a season my boat had a leak from the centre board pivot bolt. This seems to have been caused by shrinkage of the wood core when she dried out leaving a gap around the bolt. I stopped the leak by tightening the bolt. Perhaps not the best solution but it worked for me.

My D17 has a cockpit drain that should mean you can leave her afloat without a cover. But rainwater always seems to find it's way into the bilge. And with a bilge full of water the cockpit sole is below the water line. When this happens the drain works in reverse. Not good. The idea behind the foam is to prevent this by stopping water build up in the bilge.

Agree, self righting seems unlikely although a D17 would be difficult to capsize in the first place. The lack of sealed buoyancy might be more of an issue in my boat as the stuff they put under the seats would not keep her afloat. Another reason for the foam in the bilge. I think I am convincing myself here....

Jim

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